Speakers' Presentations at VR Symposium in 2015

Key Note Speech: Prof. dr. ir. Robert van Liere, department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Section Algorithms and Visualization W&I

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Abstract: Virtual Reality: from vision to real systems
Speaker: Maggie Klessens, Teacher Radiotherapy at Fontys University of Paramedics

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Abstract: Radiotherapy skills in a virtual environment
Speaker: Elvira Vos

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Abstract: Three-dimensional ultrasound volume ratio for improving cosmetic result after breast cancer surgery
Speakers: Karolien van den Akker, Huub Hamers and Youp Souren

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Abstract: (1)Conditioned desires to eat in Virtual Reality; (2)A self-contained and wearable immersive virtual environment simulation system
Speaker: dr. Jon R. Pluyter

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Abstract: Surgical Simulation Training to Improve Lives
Speakers: Alex Dimov, BIOPAC Systems

Abstract: A lifelike immersive affective stimulation system
Speaker: Anouk Keizer

Abstract:
Speaker: dr. Marnix S. van Gisbergen

Abstract: Priming: a story on how media and virtual supermarket behavior are connected.
Speaker: Els Vollenbroek

Abstract: Implementation of VR as learning method at ASML EUV Factory

Speaker: Jaap van Bosch

Abstract:

Speaker: Guido van Gageldonk, BSc, New Business Partner

Abstract: Virtual Reality
Speaker: Dr. Bernd Hentschel, RWTH Aachen University

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Abstract: Quo Vadis CAVE - Does Immersive Visualization Still Matter?
Speaker: Robert Krijnen of TNO

Abstract:
Speaker: Arie Paul van den Beukel

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Abstract: Simulating critical driving scenarios: How mid-fidelity VR helps development of automated driving.
Speaker: Jan Goetgeluk

Abstract: Live chat with Virtuix Omni CEO Jan Goetgeluk
Speaker: Frank Steinicke, University Hamburg

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Abstract: (Super-)Natural User Interfaces
Speaker: Pieter Eendebak, TNO

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Abstract: Mixed reality for maintenance in inaccessible environments?
Speaker: Gerben Harmsen, TWNKLS

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Abstract: Recognizing the space and position which the user (and his device) has in respect to the world around him
Speaker: Matthias Pusch, Worldviz

Abstract: Enterprise VR going mainstream: Consumer components are now driving a new wave of VR – how will this influence Enterprise VR applications?

 

Speaker: Prof. dr. ir. Robert van Liere, department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Section Algorithms and Visualization W&I

Virtual Reality: from vision to real systems

In 1965 Ivan Sutherland presented the vision of an "Ultimate Display", which has been a driving force for the virtual research agenda. In this talk, Robert van Liere will give a historical overview of some of the governing technologies that this vision requires. In particular, by discussing a set of high profile applications, the advances of image generation, display, tracking, audio and haptics will be assessed.

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Speaker: Maggie Klessens, Teacher Radiotherapy at Fontys University of Paramedics

Radiotherapy skills in a virtual environment

Students at Fontys MBRT are trained for working in radiology, radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and ultrasound. Last summer Fontys purchased a virtual reality system for radiotherapy, VERT (vertual environment radiotherapy). VERT presents a 3D linear accelerator with all the (im)possibilities of a real radiotherapy device and some additional possibilities like 3D dose visualization in anatomy. Using VERT gives us the uppertunity to train students treating patients with radiotherapy in a safe environment. Movements, sounds and controlling VERT -system is similar to the linear accelerator in practice. Student can make mistakes safely without harming a patient. Although we just started our preliminary results are very well. Students control the system very easily and are quickly familiar with radiotherapy techniques. Beside training students VERT can also be used informing patients about their own radiotherapy treatment plan, which gives patients more insight and understanding. First studies show positive results. We hope to investigate more about this role of VERT in further graduation projects.

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Speaker: Elvira Vos of Erasmus University

Three-dimensional ultrasound volume ratio for improving cosmetic result after breast cancer surgery

One in every eight women will get breast cancer during her lifetime which accounts for 14,000 new breast cancer diagnosis a year in the Netherlands. Surgery is the cornerstone of the breast cancer treatment for which there are two options: breast conserving surgery (BCS) and non-breast conserving surgery, i.e. mastectomy. Since breast conserving treatment followed by radiotherapy has the same prognosis as mastectomy in early stage breast cancer, the cosmetic result is an important aspect in the treatment choice which has major influence on quality of life. However preoperative cosmetic result prediction is extremely subjective and can be rather difficult. A preoperative tool that enables objective predictions of cosmetic result after BCS has the potential to aid in surgical treatment decision making and improving cosmetic results. In a retrospective study of 69 patients we evaluated the most important preoperative predictors of cosmetic result after BCS. Specifically we studied the value of tumor volume in relation to breast volume. Since no golden standard for the method of tumor and breast volume measurement is available we made use of preoperative contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI’s) projected in a CAVE™-like virtual reality system, called the I-Space (Department of Bioinformatics, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands). The V-Scope volume rendering application creates an interactive ‘hologram’ of the MRI dataset and is used to perform volume measurements. Cosmetic result was captured by clinical photographs one to five years postoperative and assessed by a five-person panel scoring on a four-point scale from bad to excellent. After adjustment for other possible predictors of cosmetic result after BCS, the only significant and preoperative available predictors were tumor volume in relation to breast volume (TV/BV ratio) and location of the tumor in the breast. Together they constitute a good performing prediction model for a bad/moderate or good/excellent result (AUC 0.83). By building a decision model for surgical treatment decision making (between BCS and mastectomy), the optimal threshold for TV/BV ratio and tumor location was calculated which makes it possible to advice the treatment with optimal cosmetic result and quality of life in clinical practice. The value of this prediction model will be tested in the TURACOS; ‘Three-dimensional Ultrasound volume RAtio for improving COSmetic result’. A randomized controlled trial measuring the TV/BV ratio by 3D-ultrasound and advising to perform BCS or not in women with breast cancer.

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Speakers: Karolien van den Akker, Huub Hamers and Youp Souren

- Conditioned desires to eat in Virtual Reality: Karolien van den Akker Phd-student Psychology and Neuroscience, Clinical Psychological Science, Eating Disorders and Addiction - A self-contained and wearable immersive virtual environment simulation system: H. Hamers P&N dep Engineering & Instrumentation and Youp Souren, stagiaire & student ICT-HS-Fontys

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Speaker: dr. Jon R. Pluyter

Surgical Simulation Training to Improve Lives

Medical knowledge and technology are evolving rapidly, providing spectacular ways of new surgical treatment of diseases. But how can our surgeons keep up with this rapid change in their surgical skills and increasing complexity of their tools and profession? There is accumulating evidence that sometimes they cannot, at the expense of their own health and patient safety . Augmented- and Virtual Reality training provide a promising answer to this challenge. In this presentation I will discuss the current state-of-the-art of surgical simulation training and go beyond it by presenting Immersive Simulation Training as a new approach to better prepare surgeons-to-be in a safe and controlled setting. As opposed to conventional surgical simulation training, immersive simulation training is performed in a realistic technological and social context similar to the context that is encountered in the operating room. I will explain how Immersive Simulation Training shapes the brain (Long-Term Memory) of the surgical trainee, in such a way that they can better cope with complexity in the operating room. Using controlled experimental testing I will demonstrate that Immersive Simulation Training effectively lowers cognitive load and stress of trainees, thereby improving surgical performance. I will explain how thermal imaging subsequently provides an objective indicator of the effectiveness of surgical skills acquisition through simulation training and is good predictor of surgical performance. In sum, this presentation provides evidence that immersive surgical simulation training can further improve patient safety in the operating room.

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Speaker: Alex Dimov, BIOPAC Systems

A lifelike immersive affective stimulation system

Inducing an emotional state in laboratory settings requires researchers to use various techniques approximating the immersion of the participant in a real-life situation. Such techniques could involve reading stories, looking at pictures and videos, using actors. These methodologies suffer in various degrees from limitations in ecological validity and/or experimental control. We propose a virtual reality based stimulation protocol that aims to deliver lifelike stimulation while maintaining very high experimental control. A collection of stimulation scenarios has been created and is constantly augmented; it is designed so that researchers can expand it easily. Physiological data can be recorded throughout the experiment and markers for events and conditions are automatically added to the physiological data record over the network. This allows the researcher to quickly analyze physiological responses to the different stimuli.

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Speaker: Anouk Keizer of Utrecht University

Abstract to follow soon

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Speaker: dr. Marnix S. van Gisbergen

Priming: a story on how media and virtual supermarket behavior are connected

We will tell you a story that started four years ago when a few researchers and developers had the idea to measure user experiences in virtual worlds using a CAVE set-up. A love & hate story about a virtual supermarket evoking tears, fights and smiles but nonetheless resulted in numerous research experiments in which over 2000 consumers visited the virtual supermarket (and yes we will provide you with the number of visitors that really sick doing that). As such we will share our experiences in how we use VE for research purposes within the media and retail domain. We will focus on a study conducted in collaboration with Heinz to measure effects of media priming and product claims on buying behavior. A total of 144 female shoppers (18-49 years) visited the supermarket and were confronted with different product claims and media. In addition we will reveal for the first time results comparing consumers’ experiences in the virtual supermarket using a CAVE versus a 3D goggle (Oculus Rift) set-up based on the ITC-SOPI scale.

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Speaker: Els Vollenbroek of ASML

Implementation of VR as learning method at ASML EUV Factory

Last year ASML implemented VR as learning method at their EUV Factory. In this presentation, Els Vollenbroek, Group lead of the Manufacturing Training department explains why ASML had to find a new learning method and why we choose for Virtual Reality. She will further explain how we develop and deliver training with VR at ASML and what the experiences from trainees and trainers are until now and how we will proceed next year. Jaap van den Bosch, owner of VROOM training and supplier of the VR training software at ASML, can show what the next steps in the VROOM training software will be to overcome some of the barriers we faced during implementation.

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Speaker: Jaap van Bosch of Vroom

Abstract to follow soon

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Speaker: Guido van Gageldonk, BSc, New Business Partner

Virtual Reality

In his speech, Guido van Gageldonk will address the applications of virtual reality available for a broad public. Virtual reality is a term mostly associated with an application that large, considerable companies with expensive and complex systems use. Guido will show that times have changed and that this does not apply anymore. Virtual reality is a hot topic and will be used more and more in our everyday lives. By means of your very own smartphone the virtual world is accessible within no time. Plug your smartphone into the cardboard and your personal virtual world is a fact. Simple and fast for a small price. A glance into the virtual world has never been that easy! Want to find out more about the possibilities? Guido will tell you everything about it! See www.vrshowroom.nl for more details.

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Speaker: Dr. Bernd Hentschel, RWTH Aachen University

Quo Vadis CAVE - Does Immersive Visualization Still Matter?

Large-scale Virtual Reality installations like CAVEs represent a major infrastructural investment; questions like "What are the benefits?" and "Is it worth it?" are plain and obvious. At the same time, visualization has long been deemed a killer application for Immersive Virtual Realtiy. In this talk, we will give an overview of more than a decade of VR-based visualization research at RWTH Aachen University and its applications across multiple disciplines. We will outline a process model for interactive visualization that specifically highlights the trade-off between ever increasing amounts of data and the realization of low-latency, highly responsive user interfaces. Against the background of a number of application case studies, which have been carried out in close collaboration with domain scientists, we will discuss the use of immersive user interfaces for interactive visualization. Based on these success stories we argue that the investment into large-scale VR installations is still justified and that there are still many interesting topics both for research and for application design.

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Speaker: Robert Krijnen of TNO

Abstract to follow soon

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Speaker: Arie Paul van den Beukel, Technische Universiteit Twente

Simulating critical driving scenarios: How mid-fidelity VR helps development of automated driving.

Reducing mobility problems through implementation of partial automated driving, raises considerable attention from industry and research. For successful implementation within existing infrastructure, a system-approach is required during development. This is because automation could raise comfort and safety in some situations, but in critical circumstances drivers would need to take over and intervene. Conventional virtual reality tools for driving mainly focus on simulating vehicle dynamics, but let underexposed the influence from changeable traffic behaviour. Within this talk, Arie Paul van den Beukel from the University of Twente, will share his experiences in creating a relevant VR environment that allows to simulate and evaluate future automated driving from a perspective of both driving performance and driver’s appreciation, including critical scenarios.

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Speaker: Jan Goetgeluk

Live chat with Virtuix Omni CEO Jan Goetgeluk

Founded by CEO Jan Goetgeluk in April 2013 and headquartered in Houston, Texas, Virtuix is at the forefront of virtual reality hardware and is the developer of the Omni – the first-of-its-kind omni-directional treadmill that addresses mobility in virtual environments. Backed by the passion of its founders and community, Virtuix raised $1.1M via Kickstarter during the summer of 2013 and has pre-sold more than 3,500 Omni units to date. Virtuix's mission is to lead the virtual reality industry to its ultimate goal of "full virtual reality" as the Omni supports natural movement, engages the entire body, and delivers an unprecedented sense of immersion. Virtuix believes that full virtual reality has the power to revolutionize how we live, learn, work and play.

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Speaker: Frank Steinicke, University Hamburg

(Super-)Natural User Interfaces

Virtual reality is often used to question whether we truly “know” if our perceptions are real or not. Movies like “The Matrix” or the fictional holodeck from the Star Trek universe are prominent examples of these kind of perceptual ambiguities. Furthermore, in movies like Steven Spielberg’s “Minority Report” or Jon Favreau’s “Iron Man 2″ actors can seamlessly use free-hand gestures in space combined with speech to manipulate 3D holographic projections, while they also perceive haptic feedback when touching the virtual objects. In my talk I will revisit some of the most visually impressive 3D user interfaces and experiences of such fictional ultimate displays. As a matter of fact, we cannot let a computer fully control the existence of matter, but we can fool our senses and give a user the illusion that the computer can after all. I will show how different ultimate displays can be implemented with current state-of-the-art technology by exploiting perceptually-inspired interfaces. However, we will see that the resulting ultimate displays are not so ultimate at all, but pose novel interesting future research challenges and questions.

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Speaker: Pieter Eendebak, TNO

Mixed reality for maintenance in inaccessible environments?

There are many applications for the combination of real and virtual data. An example is the usage of mixed reality for assisting operators performing remote maintenance in challenging environments. In this presentation we present some of technology used in real-world experiments and describe some of our results

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Speaker: Gerben Harmsen, TWNKLS

TWNKLS provides so called „mixed reality services” which take place between reality and virtuality: in the virtual continuum. Technically spoken, there is a large overlap between the development of Mixed Reality and Virtual Reality. The latter being based mainly on 3D game technology. However, in terms of application possibilities and user viewpoint there is an essential difference. The most important questions for us are: how to recognize the space around us and which position does the user (and his device) have in respect to the world around him. We need this information to know where exactly we need to place an overlay of data. We will provide you with the theoretical background of this process and as well as a demonstration of some recent examples from the TWNKLS portfolio

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Speaker: Matthias Pusch, Worldviz

Enterprise VR going mainstream: Consumer components are now driving a new wave of VR – how will this influence Enterprise VR applications?

2014 was the year of Head Mounted Displays – Facebooks purchased Oculus, and some 20 different Head Mounted Displays are in development. Virtual Reality was one of the four highlights at the recent Consumer electronics show 2015 in Las Vegas. Enterprise VR applications were historically driven by specific requirements for training, data review and communication, or specific R&D goals. Workhorse technologies were either projection based CAVEs, or micro display based Head Mounted Displays, with or without viewpoint and hand tracking. Worldviz has been a provider of such Enterprise level Virtual Reality systems and solutions for over 22 years: Started out as an USA Government program paid by NASA, NAVY, AIR Force and the affiliated academic institutions University of California and MIT in the years 1992-2001, it was transferred to a commercial entity, Worldviz LLC, in 2002. Worldviz has been serving thousands of commercial and academic clients over the last 12 years. New consumer VR components in the sectors 1) HMDs, 2)Projectors 3)Tracking and scanning, allow existing productivity applications for a much lower price level, and also enable completely new areas of applications. This talk discusses the process of this change as it happens, and points out trends for new developments.

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